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The Center for the
  Strategic Applications of Nuclear Sensors

Troy Unruh

Troy Unruh
BS-ME 2004, MS-NE 2009; Troy Unruh constructed a neutron diffractometer and neutron detector testing port as part of his master's research work. He also designed and built a 25 pixel neutron imaging array for the diffractometer. The neutron imaging array operated in real-time and allowed the user to rapidly locate the beam and determine the neutron flux. Troy presented his work at the 8th International Conference on Position Sensitive Detectors, held in Glasgow, Scotland (Sept. 1 - 5, 2008), where he awarded "Best Student Poster". Troy now works at Idaho National Laboratory. Advisor: Douglas S. McGregor


E-mail:troypod@gmail.com

See a short video of the imaging array in operation by "clicking" here. You will be watching the graphic interface as the detector and software are operated under different output conditions.

Troy Unruh prepares a high temperature furnace for an oxidation run.
Troy Unruh prepares a high temperature furnace for an oxidation run.

A top view of the diffractor port. Most of what is shown is the shielding around the diffactometer. The instrument is barely visible in the gap between the shielding and the reactor biological shield.
A top view of the diffractor port. Most of what is shown is the shielding around the diffactometer. The instrument is barely visible in the gap between the shielding and the reactor biological shield.

The detector testing port fastened to the diffractometer shield wall. The instrument is used to test neutron detectors at various angles in a thermalized neutron beam.
The detector testing port fastened to the diffractometer shield wall. The instrument is used to test neutron detectors at various angles in a thermalized neutron beam.

The Si neutron detector array chip. The detector array uses 5 mm x 5mm pixels and is approximately 1 inch square total area. The device utilizes LiF as a neutron converter layer.
The Si neutron detector array chip. The detector array uses 5 mm x 5mm pixels and is approximately 1 inch square total area. The device utilizes LiF as a neutron converter layer.

The detector array and accompanying readout electronics. The device operates as a transmission detector, and provides data to the user in real time.
The detector array and accompanying readout electronics. The device operates as a transmission detector, and provides data to the user in real time.

The detector readout interface is user friendly, based on LabView, and provides vital information to the beamport user. On the left is total counts (fluence), center is real time count rate, and right is the average count rate.  The small bulge at the bottom of the real time count rate is due to the detector being moved (as a demonstration).
The detector readout interface is user friendly, based on LabView, and provides vital information to the beamport user. On the left is total counts (fluence), center is real time count rate, and right is the average count rate. The small bulge at the bottom of the real time count rate is due to the detector being moved (as a demonstration).



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